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Alberta Legislation

 

Alberta Lockout

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © 1995 - 2010 Government of Alberta.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE 2009

Part 15 Managing the Control of Hazardous Energy

Isolation
212(1) If machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is to be serviced,
repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected, an employer must ensure that no worker
performs such work on the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment
until it has come to a complete stop and
(a) all hazardous energy at the location at which the work is to be carried
out is isolated by activation of an energy isolating device and the
energy–isolating device is secured in accordance with section 214, 215,
or 215.1 as designated by the employer, or
(b) the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is otherwise
rendered inoperative in a manner that prevents its accidental
activation and provides equal or greater protection than the
protection afforded under (a).
212(2) An employer must develop and implement procedures and controls that
ensure the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is serviced,
repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected safely if
(a) the manufacturer’s specifications require the machinery, equipment
or powered mobile equipment to remain operative while it is being
serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted, or inspected, or
(b) there are no manufacturer’s specifications and it is not reasonably
practicable to stop or render the machinery, equipment or powered
mobile equipment inoperative.
212(3) If piping, a pipeline or a process system containing a harmful substance
under pressure is to be serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected, an
employer must ensure that no worker performs such work on the piping,
pipeline or process system until flow in the piping, pipeline or process system
has been stopped or regulated to a safe level, and the location at which the work
is to be carried out is isolated and secured in accordance with section 215.4.

Verifying isolation
213 A worker must not perform work on machinery, equipment or powered
mobile equipment to be serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected until
(a) the actions required by subsection 212(1) are completed,
(b) the machinery, equipment, or powered mobile equipment is tested to
verify that it is inoperative, and
(c) the worker is satisfied that it is inoperative.

Securing Isolation

Securing by individual workers
214(1) Once all energy isolating devices have been activated to control
hazardous energy in accordance with section 212(1), an employer must ensure
that a worker involved in work at each location requiring control of hazardous
energy secures each energy isolating device with a personal lock.
214(2) Once each energy isolating device is secured as required by subsection
(1), the worker must verify that the hazardous energy source has been effectively
isolated.
214(3) If more than one worker is working at each location requiring hazardous
energy to be controlled,
(a) each worker must attach a personal lock to each energy‐isolating
device, and
(b) the first worker applying a lock must verify that the hazardous
energy source has been effectively isolated.
214(4) If a worker who has placed a personal lock is reassigned before the work is completed, or the work is extended from one shift to another, an employer must ensure that
(a) another worker, authorized by the employer to do so, attaches a
personal lock to the energy‐isolating device prior to removal of the
reassigned or departing worker’s lock, or
(b) there is an effective and orderly transfer of control of the reassigned
or departing worker’s lock.
214(5) An employer must ensure that each personal lock used has a unique
mark or identification tag on it to identify it as belonging to the worker to whom
it is assigned.
214(6) An employer must ensure that the name of the worker to whom a
personal lock or identification tag is assigned is readily available during the time
a hazardous energy source is isolated.
214(7) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an
employer must ensure that the machinery, equipment or powered mobile
equipment is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

Securing by a group
215(1) If a large number of workers is working on machinery, equipment or
powered mobile equipment, or a number of energy isolating devices must be
secured, an employer may use a group procedure in accordance with subsections (2) through (6).
215(2) An employer must ensure that the group procedure referred to in
subsection (1) is readily available to workers at the work site where the group
procedure is used.
215(3) Once all required energy isolating devices have been activated in
accordance with section 212(1) by a worker designated by the employer, an
employer must ensure that a designated worker has
(a) secured all energy isolating devices,
(b) secured any keys for the devices used under clause (a) to a key
securing system such as a lock box,
(c) completed, signed and posted a checklist that identifies the machinery
or equipment covered by the hazardous energy control procedure,
and
(d) verified and documented that all sources of hazardous energy are
effectively isolated.
215(4) Each worker working at each location requiring control of hazardous
energy must apply a personal lock to the key securing system referred to in
subsection (3)(b) before working on the machinery, equipment or powered
mobile equipment.
215(5) If a worker who has placed a personal lock is reassigned before the work
is completed, or the work is extended from one shift to another, an employer
must ensure that there is an effective and orderly transfer of control of the
reassigned or departing worker’s personal lock.
215(6) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, a
worker referred to in subsection (4) must remove his or her personal lock from
the key securing system.
215(7) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an
employer must ensure that the machinery, equipment, or powered mobile
equipment is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

Securing by complex group control
215.1(1) If it is not reasonably practicable to secure energy isolating devices in
accordance with sections 214 or 215 because of
(a) the physical size and extent of the machinery, equipment, piping,
pipeline, or process system,
(b) the relative inaccessibility of the energy isolating devices,
(c) the number of workers involved in the work requiring hazardous
energy control,
(d) the number of energy isolating devices involved,
(e) the extended length of time of the required isolation, or
(f) the interdependence and interrelationship of the components in the
system or between different systems,
an employer may use a complex group control process approved by a Director of
Inspection.
215.1(2) Prior to initiating a complex group control process, an employer must
complete a hazard assessment to identify the type and location of hazardous
energy sources.
215.1(3) If using a complex group control process, an employer must ensure that
(a) procedures are implemented to ensure continuous safe performance
of the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy,
(b) a work permit or master tag procedure is implemented so that
(i) each involved worker personally signs on the job before
commencing the work and signs off the job upon completing the work, or
(ii) a crew leader signs on and off the job for a crew or team of
workers,
(c) a worker designated by the employer
(i) has activated all required energy‐isolating devices to control
hazardous energy in accordance with section 212(1), and
(ii) has secured the energy‐isolating devices, and
(d) another worker designated by the employer has verified that all
sources of hazardous energy are effectively isolated.
215.1(4) If a complex group control process is being used and provided that the
isolation point is reasonably accessible and isolation is required for the work being undertaken by the worker, each involved worker may place personal locks on the energy isolating devices and verify effective isolation.
215.1(5) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an
employer must ensure that the machinery, equipment, piping, pipeline or process
system is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3

Securing remotely controlled systems
215.2(1) If securing an energy isolating device as required by section 212(1) is not reasonably practicable on a system that remotely controls the operation of
machinery, equipment, piping, a pipeline or a process system, an employer must
ensure that control system isolating devices and the procedures for applying and
securing them provide equal or greater protection than the protection afforded
under section 212(1)(a).
215.2(2) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an
employer must ensure that the system is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

Returning to operation
215.3(1) A person must not remove a personal lock or other securing device unless
(a) the person is the worker who installed it,
(b) the person is the designated worker under section 215(3) or section
215.1(3)(c), or
(c) the person is acting in accordance with the procedures required under
section 215.2
215.3(2) Despite subsection (1), in an emergency or if the worker who installed a
lock or other securing device is not available, a worker designated by the employer may remove the lock or other securing device in accordance with a procedure that includes verifying that no worker will be in danger due to the removal.
215.3(3) An employer must ensure that securing devices are not removed until
(a) each involved worker is accounted for,
(b) any personal locks placed by workers under sections 214, 215(4) or
215.1(4) are removed,
(c) procedures are implemented to verify that no worker is in danger
before a worker under section 214(1), designated under section 215(3),
designated under section 215.1(3)(c), or in accordance with
procedures under section 215.2 removes the securing devices and the
machinery, equipment, powered mobile equipment, piping, pipeline
or process system is returned to operation.
215.3(4) An employer must ensure that each involved worker follows the
procedures under subsection (3)(c).

Piping and Pigging

Isolating piping
215.4(1) To isolate piping or a pipeline containing harmful substances under
pressure, an employer may use
(a) a system of blanking or blinding, or
(b) a double block and bleed isolation system providing
(i) two blocking seals on either side of the isolation point, and
(ii) an operable bleed off between the two seals.
215.4(2) An employer must ensure that piping that is blanked or blinded is clearly
marked to indicate that a blank or blind is installed.
215.4(3) An employer must ensure that, if valves or similar blocking seals with a
Bleed off valve between them are used to isolate piping, the bleed off valve is
secured in the “OPEN” position and the valves or similar blocking seals in the flow lines are functional and secured in the “CLOSED” position.
215.4(4) An employer must ensure that the device used to secure the valves or
seals described in subsection (3) is
(a) a positive mechanical means of keeping the valves or seals in the
required position, and
(b) strong enough and designed to withstand inadvertent opening
without the use of excessive force, unusual measures or destructive
techniques.
215.4(5) If it is not reasonably practicable to provide blanking, blinding or double
block and bleed isolation, an employer must ensure that an alternate means of
isolation that provides adequate protection to workers, certified as appropriate and safe by a professional engineer, is implemented.

Part 22 Safeguards

Safeguards
310(2) An employer must provide safeguards if a worker may accidentally, or
through the work process, come into contact with
(a) moving parts of machinery or equipment,
(b) points of machinery or equipment at which material is cut, shaped or
bored,
(c) surfaces with temperatures that may cause skin to freeze, burn or
blister,
(d) energized electrical cables,
(e) debris, material or objects thrown from machinery or equipment,
(f) material being fed into or removed from process machinery or
equipment,
(g) machinery or equipment that may be hazardous due to its operation,
or
(h) any other hazard.
310(2.1) Repealed
310(3) Subsection (2) does not apply to machinery that already has a safeguard
that
(a) automatically stops the machinery if a worker comes into contact with
a moving part or a point at which material is cut, shaped or bored,
(b) prevents a worker from coming into contact with a hazard referred to
in subsection (2), or
(c) eliminates the hazards referred to in subsection (2) before a worker
can be injured.
310(4) If an employer determines that an effective safeguard cannot be provided
in the circumstances, the employer must ensure that an alternative mechanism or system or a change in work procedure is put into place to protect workers from
being exposed to hazards that exist if there is no safeguard.
310(5) An alternative mechanism or system or a change in work procedure put
into place under subsection (4) must offer protection to workers that is equal to or
greater than the protection from a safeguard referred to in subsection (3).
Occupational Health and Safety Code 2009 Part 22
22-2
310(6) An employer must place warning signs on machinery that starts
automatically
(a) on a clearly visible location at a point of access to the machinery, and
(b) that give clear instructions to workers on the nature of the hazard.

Tampering with safeguards
311(1) A person must not remove a safeguard from a machine that is operating
if the safeguard is not designed to be removed when the machine is operating.
311(2) A person must not remove a safeguard or make it ineffective unless
removing it or making it ineffective is necessary to perform maintenance, tests,
repairs, adjustments or other tasks on equipment.
311(3) If a worker removes a safeguard or makes it ineffective, the worker must
ensure that
(a) alternative protective measures are in place until the safeguard is
replaced,
(b) the safeguard is replaced immediately after the task is completed, and
(c) the safeguard functions properly once replaced.
311(4) If a safeguard for machinery is removed or made ineffective and the
machinery cannot be directly controlled by a worker, the worker who removes
the safeguard or makes it ineffective must lock out or lock out and tag the
machinery or render it inoperative.

No safeguards
312(1) Despite other sections in this Part, an employer may allow the machinery
to be operated without the safeguards if
(a) safeguards are normally required by this Code for machinery, and
(b) the machinery cannot accommodate or operate with these safeguards.
312(2) If machinery in subsection (1) is operated without safeguards, the
employer must ensure workers operating or in the vicinity of the machine wear
personal protective equipment that
(a) is appropriate to the hazard, and
(b) offers protection equal to or greater than that offered by the
safeguards.

Part 18 Personal Protective Equipment

Duty to use personal protective equipment
228(1) If the hazard assessment indicates the need for personal protective
equipment, an employer must ensure that
(a) workers wear personal protective equipment that is correct for the
hazard and protects workers,
(b) workers properly use and wear the personal protective equipment,
(c) the personal protective equipment is in a condition to perform the
function for which it was designed, and
(d) workers are trained in the correct use, care, limitations and assigned
maintenance of the personal protective equipment.
228(2) A worker must
(a) use and wear properly the appropriate personal protective equipment
specified in this Code in accordance with the training and instruction
received,
(b) inspect the personal protective equipment before using it, and
(c) not use personal protective equipment that is unable to perform the
function for which it is designed.
228(3) An employer must ensure that the use of personal protective equipment
does not itself endanger the worker.

Eye Protection

Compliance with standards
229(1) If a worker’s eyes may be injured or irritated at a work site, an employer
must ensure that the worker wears properly fitting eye protection equipment
that
(a) is approved to
(i) CSA Standard Z94.3 07, Eye and Face Protectors,
(ii) CSA Standard Z94.3 02, Eye and Face Protectors, or
(iii) CSA Standard Z94.3 99, Industrial Eye and Face Protectors, and
(b) is appropriate to the work being done and the hazard involved.
229(2) Prescription eyewear may be worn if it
(a) is safety eyewear,
(b) meets the requirements of
(i) CSA Standard Z94.3 07, Eye and Face Protectors,
(ii) CSA Standard Z94.3 02, Eye and Face Protectors, or
Occupational Health and Safety Code 2009 Part 18
18-2
(iii) CSA Standard Z94.3 99, Industrial Eye and Face Protectors, and
(c) is appropriate to the work and the hazard involved.
229(2.1) Prescription safety eyewear having glass lenses must not be used if there is danger of impact unless it is worn behind equipment meeting the requirements of subsection (1).
229(2.2) If the use of plastic prescription lenses is impracticable, and there is no
danger of impact, a worker may use lenses made of treated safety glass meeting
the requirements of
(a) ANSI Standard Z87.1 2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye
and Face Protection Devices, or
(b) ANSI Standard Z87.1 1989, Practice for Occupational and Educational
Eye and Face Protection.
229(2.3) Despite subsection (2), prescription safety eyewear may consist of frames that meet the requirements of ANSI Standard Z87.1 2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices provided the lenses meet the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.3 07, Eye and Face Protectors.
229(3) If a worker must wear a full face piece respirator and the face piece is
intended to prevent materials striking the eyes, an employer must ensure that the
face piece
(a) meets the requirements of
(i) CSA Standard Z94.3 07, Eye and Face Protectors, or
(ii) CSA Standard Z94.3 02, Eye and Face Protectors, or
(b) meets the impact and penetration test requirements of section 9 of
(i) ANSI Standard Z87.1 2003, Occupational and Educational Personal
Eye and Face Protection Devices, or
(ii) ANSI Standard Z87.1 1989, Practice for Occupational and Educational
Eye and Face Protection.

Contact lenses
230 An employer must ensure that, if wearing contact lenses poses a hazard to
the worker’s eyes during work, the worker is advised of the hazards and the
alternatives to wearing contact lenses.

 

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